Is the Missguided £1 Bikini A Real Bargain


If you're an avid fast fashion buyer or you like to stay in the loop, you would have seen that Missguided released a £1 bikini: a simple black triangle shape bikini ranging from sizes 4-24. The offer is for a limited time only; releasing 1000s onto the website each day. For some, this might sound like heaven. A cheap bikini perfect for Summer: a great staple. It even beats the prices of Primark and other brands promising cheap affordable clothing.


But how much of a bargain is this bikini for the consumer and the producers, when the bikini is only £1. This brings the question, how much is it really costing to make it? Are they really making a profit or are they shortchanging the suppliers and the workers behind that £1 bikini? When we break the bikini down it's all about polyester, which is largely unsustainable and harms the planet massively. So, if it's really worth that one photo of you on an inflatable in Greece then you do you, but for the rest of us, I think it's time we started taking responsibility and be more conscious about where we shop.


I've talked about fast fashion and the impacts this has, but I think with this, in particular, it opens up another part of the argument. And it's the fact that nobody wants to spend the extra money, it's no lie that sustainable items tend to generally cost more. Which means that Missguided, PLT and all those that fall under the umbrella of fast fashion get away with selling £25 tops that cost them about £2 to make and don't benefit anyone but their Instagram account. It's a bit sad when you think about how many people buy and get rid of clothes so quickly to stick with the current niche, but there are ways we can tackle the impact of fast fashion on the planet.


Now obviously, it would be to just stop buying into fast fashion but in this day and age when it's so easy to get something and have it delivered to you in less than 24 hours people aren't gonna just give it up. I'll put up my hand and admit that I do shop on these websites, not as often as I used to but when I go on there I have a purpose and an idea of what I want and if I'm really gonna get my wear out of it. But what can you do when there's a pile of over the top neon dresses and tops that you bought for Parklife and Ibiza that you don't want anymore because it's not all over Instagram anymore. Well, there's a few things to try.






First, off DEPOP, I have a love/hate relationship with depop at times. It's great when you just sell an item and it all goes smooth but it's even more annoying when you put something on therefor £15 and somebody tries to buy it for £6 like come on babes that barely covers the postage as well. But once you get the swing of Depop it's easy to sell stuff on there, especially if you're going through your stuff regularly and getting rid of pieces as you go. When I moved back from University I managed with a lot of effort (don't laugh) to get a big bag full of stuff to put on Depop now for someone like myself who has a lot of clothes on rotation it's good to get a bag full. But what it means is I've managed to clear up some space, ensure the clothes don't go to waste and got an extra bit of dollar on the side.

If you don't feel like getting everything up on Depop, clothes swaps are a great idea. You can do this with your mates or some Universities even organise it, it's a great way to get out with the old and in with the new. Especially if your friend has something that you've wanted for ages it's a win-win situation, as a little disclaimer in case it wasn't clear but obviously just be careful for hygiene reasons with some of the clothing you swap.  

Or if you don't want to sell off your clothes to people or see your mates in your old clothes then send them off to charity. Whether it's a local charity shop or a charity bins dotted around across the Uk there are tons of places to give your unwanted clothes to, I know a few of my friends who have even managed to upcycle some of their clothes into new things such as blankets or even into bralettes, it can be really easy to change the style of something and make it feel completely different. I've attached a little Pinterest thread here, giving you a bit of inspiration on what you could do!

All in all, there is a range of ways we can help to reduce the impact of fast fashion. And more so, to be conscious of what's in our wardrobes and how we can ensure it gets all the use it can. Nobody is going to be absolutely amazing at this and in no way shape or form am I but there are changes everyone can do to ensure fast fashion doesn't take over. Let me know about the little bits you'd want to change down below.


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1 Comments

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